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Senior Capstone Project: Guide

Emerging Voices - Capstone Project

Senior Capstone Research Symposium

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Venues 

 

The Science Lecture Hall 

The Library                  The Chapel           

 

- seats 63

- seats 75

    - seats 300

 

The Webb School Senior Symposium April 1-12, 2019 

Monday, April 1, 2019

Chapel - Lennon Ilarde and Cailey Patterson
Why people believe in conspiracy theories
Coral Bleaching and Its Consequences
Lennon Ilarde Why people believe in conspiracy theories What if I told you that the moon landing was fake-nothing more than a Hollywood set? That those airplanes’ trails you see in the sky are chemicals sprayed by the government? That fluorescent light bulbs are being required by the government because they make people more obedient? Would you call me craaaaazy? Would you say, “What the h-e-double hockey sticks are you thinking?!?” That’s exactly what I’m trying to answer in my Senior Project. I set out to find what drives people to believe conspiracy theories. Is it to feel special? Is it because they want to feel like they know some big secret? 
 
Cailey Patterson Coral Bleaching and Its Consequences Coral are perhaps one of the most complex and fascinating species on our planet. Although they cover only 0.2% of the ocean’s floor, coral reefs are home to 25% of all marine life and have been around for over 200 million years. However, in the past 30 years, we have lost 50% of the world’s coral due to massive, global bleaching events caused by climate change. So, if you are wondering why this (show picture of healthy reef) is becoming this (show picture of bleached coral), come see my presentation.
 
Library - Jessie Song and Anthony Culp
Crime prediction and data science
Vexillology
Anthony Culp Vexillology Look up around you and ask yourself: what do you see? What you are looking at are a wide range of flags, each one representing an entirely different nation of people from the next. My senior project is an exploration of flags. Why do we use them to represent ourselves? Why choose a piece of colorful cloth to be such an important part of our collective identities? Why do flags look the way they do? All these questions (and more) will be poised and answered in my senior project on Vexillology, the study of flags.
 
Jessie Song  Crime prediction and data science Catching criminals are important. But it is even better if we could prevent those criminal events to begin with. Data science sounds distant and boring, but it is unimaginable how much advantage it has on crime prediction field. We can predict when, where, how certain crimes might occur, so that police forces are effectively located to aim for no victim. But guess what. You can also be under surveillance by posting certain things online, and what users describe their feelings to be is analyzed to build a crime prediction model. If your favorite genre is criminal film, or if you are interested in learning about how data science is applied in a practical field, this is the perfect senior presentation for you!
 
 
 
Sci Lecture - Scarlett Liu and Rachel Bernstein
String Theory
Music Therapy
 
 
Rachel Bernstein Music Therapy Music is everywhere; it surrounds us. We live off of our Spotify and/or Apple Music playlists. Music does more than just go in one ear and out the other though. Music can control our brains, our emotions, and actions, which is where music therapy comes in. Music therapy is the use of music to address the emotional, cognitive, physical, and social needs for a group of people or just individuals. In my presentation, I go over music’s effects on people and how different genres of music can come into play. Music affects all living things, from people to elephants.
Scarlett Liu String Theory For over a hundred years, scientists have been looking for a theory that can not only explain various observations on photons and other small particles, but also every aspect of the physical world. The string theory by far has the most potential of becoming the law that concludes all patterns of the universe. In this presentation, we will be exploring the fundamentals of the theory, development of it, and its scientific bases. I will be introducing the basic ideas behind string theory and explaining why it is the strongest candidate for what physicists call a theory of everything.   

 

Wednesday, April 3, 2019

Chapel - Tommy Zhuo and Allie Avent

Library   - Ivan Plakasov and Frank Li

Sci Lecture - Selina Liang and Alice Lin

 

Thursday, April 4, 2019

Chapel       Madeline Boyanton and Ella Wimberley

Library Noel Kim and Emmanuel Oñate

Sci Lecture Medusa Qu and JJ Thephavong [Eli Nichols moved to April 8]

 

 

 

Friday, April 5, 2019

Chapel    -    AJ Clarke and Gwyneth Seagroves

Library     -   Kane Edwards and Sana Alsalman

Sci Lecture  -  Caroline Wetherbee and Laura Kate Yancey

Monday, April 8, 2019

Chapel    -    Henry Moore and Eli Nichols [ JJ Thephavong moved to April 4]

Library    -     Cole Zuckowsky

 

 

 

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Chapel   -    Alex Reavis and Carol Zhou

Library    -   Cole Connelly and Stefania Morozova

Sci Lecture   -    Brandon Azar and Kayla Taylor

Thursday, April 11, 2012

Chapel  - Spoony Sizemore and Nile Archer

Library -  Elijah Foutch and Yang Zhong

Sci Lecture  -  Richard Ebri and Jin Nettles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday, April 12, 2019

Chapel - Brooke Williams and Jonathan Nam

Library - Ollie Hutchens and Thomas Simmons

Sci Lecture  -  Annie Zhou and Collin King

 

 

 

 

Jump Start:

Write your paper with the presentation in mind.  

Maybe even build your presentation slides to help organize and outline the paper.   

Things to include in the Presentation: 

  • · Introduction
  • · Background Research
  • · Primary Research Methods
  • · Primary Research Findings
  • · Conclusion

 

Introduction

How will you introduce the topic to the audience? 

· Brief gripping story or anecdote

· Surprising, and highly significant facts or statistics

· Summary of a compelling case study

· Powerful quote that leads into your research

Background Research:

  • WHO - Who are the researchers in the field? Who am I writing about?
  • WHERE - Where does the research take place? Is there a prominent location or institution in the research?
  • WHAT - What are the relevant studies? What is the state of the art today? 
  • WHEN - When does the research take place? What dates are significant?
  • HOW – How was the research conducted? How have others gone about trying to solve problems you want to tackle, and in what ways will your approach build on and vary from previous work?

 

Primary Research 

Primary Research Methodology:

Write about how you conducted research - Methodology [Primary Research - Survey, Interview, Test, Experiment, Case Study, Contrast/Comparison, Project Journal, and Internship] 

Primary Research Findings:

Data to include - Findings/Data/Results  

[Explanation of your results can include the use of Tables, Photos, and Maps]

CITE your sources 

This portion of the paper is meant to transform information into insight

“A good researcher knows how to use both primary and secondary sources in her writing and to integrate them in a cohesive fashion.”

Primary Research  must be approved by both your adviser and the lead senior adviser

Research Methodology [Primary Research - Survey, Interview, Test, Experiment, Case Study, Contrast/Comparison, Project Journal, Internship]
Findings/Data/Results [explanation of results includes the use of Tables, Photos, and Maps] 


25 Ideas for Primary Research

Primary research involves collecting data about a given subject directly from the real world. [Driscoll & Brizee]

  1. Interview an Expert or Professional face to face

  2. Interview an Expert or Professional via phone, Skype, OR email

  3. Visit a Museum

  4. Tour a Factory or Business

  5. Volunteer at an organization

  6. Attend a meeting or service [church, brotherhood, fraternity, society, club]

  7. Shadow an expert [in person or online]

  8. Internship or Externship

  9. Camp or Retreat

  10. Attend a cultural festival [PowWow, Storytelling festival, African Street Festival,  Nashville Greek Festival, etc.]

  11. Participate in an event [charity or community]

  12. Curation - Creating a collection of resources [physical or online]

  13. Following Twitter Feeds or Blogs - journaling your impressions

  14. Starting a Twitter Feed or blog about your topic

  15. Keeping a research journal

  16. Video Journal an experience

  17. Conduct an Experiment

  18. Test Computer Code

  19. Create an App

  20. Chart a Contrast/Comparison

  21. Creating an “Infographic” to include in your presentation

  22. Questionnaires to a small group of people

  23. Survey a group [survey must be approved by Teacher and Lead Adviser]

  24. Create a Statistical survey

  25. Opinion Poll

Elevator Speech

 

Video your elevator pitch.

An app with a teleprompter is BigVu  

Apple      Google Play

 

 

Ideas from YouTube University of Manchester 

100 words due January 30, 2019  [If you are having trouble check out the Thesis tab video]

[typed, submitted electronically via Google docs to Adviser, English Teacher, and Lead Sr. Adviser]

Where to start: attention-grabbing statistic, very brief anecdote, or a poignant quote. Then …

What is the topic of your research?

• What is the problem, issue, or question that you are

asking and addressing in your research? 

• Why is that problem interesting and important? (i.e. So what?)

• How does your work connect with a broader disciplinary conversation about this topic/problem in your field, and what does it add to that conversation?

Language

• key nouns  • offer topical touchstones that are accessible to wide range of educated people • avoid jargon if possible or deliver specialized terms using appositives

Crafting the elevator pitch:

• Delivery

• Eye contact--read your listener

• Enthusiasm

• Practice, practice, practice!

 

the elevator pitch: presenting your research in conversation  From University of Notre Dame -  Matthew Capdevielle, PhD, University Writing Center,  Ralf Bendlin, Electrical Engineering and Gretchen Busl, Literature {https://graduateschool.nd.edu/assets/32665/elevator_pitch_presentation.pdf}

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Research

Good Place to Start

Questions to ask and answer in your research:

Webb Library Catalog

Subscription Databases

Free Online Journals

Humanities

STEM                 

JURN finds arts and humanities journals, book chapters, and theses. Science Direct site has 250,000 open-access articles.
Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) searches more than 7,000 open-access journals, which are searchable at the article level. Wiley free and open-access journals.
High Wire Press boasts that it provides “the largest archive of free full-text science on Earth!” Look for journals marked “free site.” National Institutes of Health offers some of the most extensive access to health research.
 

Begin Incorporating Primary Research

This portion of the paper is meant to transform information into insight

“A good researcher knows how to use both primary and secondary sources in her writing and to integrate them in a cohesive fashion.”

Primary Research  must be approved by both your adviser and the lead senior adviser

Research Methodology [Primary Research - Survey, Interview, Test, Experiment, Case Study, Contrast/Comparison, Project Journal, Internship]
Findings/Data/Results [explanation of results includes the use of Tables, Photos, and Maps] 


25 Ideas for Primary Research

Primary research involves collecting data about a given subject directly from the real world. [Driscoll & Brizee]

  1. Interview an Expert or Professional face to face

  2. Interview an Expert or Professional via phone, Skype, OR email

  3. Visit a Museum

  4. Tour a Factory or Business

  5. Volunteer at an organization

  6. Attend a meeting or service [church, brotherhood, fraternity, society, club]

  7. Shadow an expert [in person or online]

  8. Internship or Externship

  9. Camp or Retreat

  10. Attend a cultural festival [PowWow, Storytelling festival, African Street Festival,  Nashville Greek Festival, etc.]

  11. Participate in an event [charity or community]

  12. Curation - Creating a collection of resources [physical or online]

  13. Following Twitter Feeds or Blogs - journaling your impressions

  14. Starting a Twitter Feed or blog about your topic

  15. Keeping a research journal

  16. Video Journal an experience

  17. Conduct an Experiment

  18. Test Computer Code

  19. Create an App

  20. Chart a Contrast/Comparison

  21. Creating an “Infographic” to include in your presentation

  22. Questionnaires to a small group of people

  23. Survey a group [survey must be approved by Teacher and Lead Adviser]

  24. Create a Statistical survey

  25. Opinion Poll

 

MTSU Library

Please make sure the MTSU permission slip is signed by both parent and student.

Wednesday, October 10, 2018 Seniors will complete research in the MTSU library and tour the campus with our college counseling staff.  We will take a bus from Bell Buckle leaving around 8:00 am.  Day student drivers may meet at 8:45 am sharp location TBD.   We will research for senior projects for about three hours, then have lunch at MTSU food court.  We will return to campus for the last class of the day.  Seniors look sharp, but you can wear jeans. Bring money for lunch [about $10]

Timeline

Date    

Description

Deliverable

Grading

First Semester

Sept

Topic Selection

Choosing a topic is a process.  You will conduct “pre-search” to ensure that your topic is viable.  Choose a topic that is neither too broad nor too narrow.  Make sure that enough scholarly material is available on the topic

Ponder:

When was the last time you were listening to the television, news, or a speaker and you felt compelled to “fact check”?

What Broad Discipline do you find most interesting?

List 1-2 things that you think might be viable research topics.

Type 10-20 Key Words to use in your pre-search

 

Use the GALE – Topic Finder Tool

Use JSTOR text analyzer

Read 3 topic starter lists in the LibGuide

 

 

 

Oct 10

Annotated Bibliography

6 sources with annotation - Students can begin submitting these immediately. 

Summation of the source [focus on what is unique about the source]

A brief evaluation statement(s) [is this a "scholarly" source or not]

How the work is relevant to your research [How, specifically, do you intend to use the source (e.g. as evidence to support a claim, as a counter-argument, etc.)]

Use the GIST summarizing strategy

Annotated Bibliography 

English IV

Quiz grades for each annotation

Oct 10

 

University Library Visit

Field Trip

 

Nov

Thesis

Thesis writing instruction may be covered in the English IV Class and in the LibGuide video

 

 

Nov

Conclude Primary Research

[Primary Research - Survey, Interview, Test,

Experiment, Case Study, Contrast/Comparison, Project Journal, Internship] Includes Findings/Data/Results [explanation of results includes the use of Tables, Photos, and

Maps]  Summer internships and volunteer work can be great opportunities for primary research.  If your senior advisor is not in the field you are researching, we will find an additional subject advisor to help with the research. 

 

See 25 ideas for Primary Research

 

Nov

Make an Outline

  1. Ms. Camp style Outline 
  2. Write with your Presentation in Mind Outline  Use your Presentation Slides as an Outline

 

Try one of the two strategies for planning your paper

 

Dec

 

Paper Draft Due before the holiday break

Label Google Doc - Surname_2019

example - Smith_2019

 

 

Paper Draft

Eng. IV Grade

 

Date    

Description

Deliverable

Grading

 

Second Semester

Jan

Final Revised Draft

 

 

Final Eng. IV Grade

January

Seminar

instruction

How to Give a Research Project Speech

 

 

To Students

February

Elevator Speech

100 words due January 30, 2019 

[typed, submitted electronically via Google docs to Adviser, English Teacher, and Lead Sr. Adviser]

Where to start: attention-grabbing statistic, very brief anecdote, or a poignant quote.

Advertisement for your presentation

 

February

Practice with Presentation Visuals [at least 2-types Charts, Illustrations, Graphs] We will have an online sign-up tool for Practice in the Chapel

Presentation Visuals

 

March Research Symposium

Presentations will be 10 – 12 minutes in length Must follow formatting instructions / We will hold in 3 to 4 locations on campus grouped by discipline or advisory – Q & A to follow presentation

Presentation of Research Paper

Advisers will grade with the presentation grading sheet must make a 70%

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