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Senior Capstone Project: Guide

Emerging Voices - Capstone Project

Senior Capstone Project Resources

Timeline

 

April 

Writing and Outlining Tips

April 9-13 Writing Workshop in English Class

April 16-20 Peer Review of Rough Draft 

April 23-27th Writing Final Draft

April 27th  Final Revised Draft Eng. IV Grade

 

 

 

Final Presentation Document Due 

  • Label Google Slides -  Surname_2018
  • example - Smith_2018
  • [You may use Prezi or PowerPoint as well]
 

 

March 1-22   Research Symposium

Presentation Teaser / Elevator Speech 1 - 2 slides to advertise the presentation in the chapel    [15-25 students each week during the symposium]

Presentations will be 10 – 12 minutes in length

Must follow formatting instructions / We will hold in 3 to 4 locations on campus grouped by discipline 

Elevator Speech

Ideas from YouTube University of Manchester 

100 words due January 30, 2017  [If you are having trouble check out the Thesis tab video]

[typed, submitted electronically via Google docs to Adviser, English Teacher, and Lead Sr. Adviser]

Where to start: attention-grabbing statistic, very brief anecdote, or a poignant quote. Then …

What is the topic of your research?

• What is the problem, issue, or question that you are

asking and addressing in your research? 

• Why is that problem interesting and important? (i.e. So what?)

• How does your work connect with a broader disciplinary conversation about this topic/problem in your field, and what does it add to that conversation?

Language

• key nouns  • offer topical touchstones that are accessible to wide range of educated people • avoid jargon if possible or deliver specialized terms using appositives

Crafting the elevator pitch:

• Delivery

• Eye contact--read your listener

• Enthusiasm

• Practice, practice, practice!

 

the elevator pitch: presenting your research in conversation  From University of Notre Dame -  Matthew Capdevielle, PhD, University Writing Center,  Ralf Bendlin, Electrical Engineering and Gretchen Busl, Literature {https://graduateschool.nd.edu/assets/32665/elevator_pitch_presentation.pdf}

Begin Incorporating Primary Research

This portion of the paper is meant to transform information into insight

“A good researcher knows how to use both primary and secondary sources in her writing and to integrate them in a cohesive fashion.”

Primary Research  must be approved by both your adviser and the lead senior adviser

Research Methodology [Primary Research - Survey, Interview, Test, Experiment, Case Study, Contrast/Comparison, Project Journal, Internship]
Findings/Data/Results [explanation of results includes the use of Tables, Photos, and Maps] 


25 Ideas for Primary Research

Primary research involves collecting data about a given subject directly from the real world. [Driscoll & Brizee]

  1. Interview an Expert or Professional face to face

  2. Interview an Expert or Professional via phone, Skype, OR email

  3. Visit a Museum

  4. Tour a Factory or Business

  5. Volunteer at an organization

  6. Attend a meeting or service [church, brotherhood, fraternity, society, club]

  7. Shadow an expert [in person or online]

  8. Internship or Externship

  9. Camp or Retreat

  10. Attend a cultural festival [PowWow, Storytelling festival, African Street Festival,  Nashville Greek Festival, etc.]

  11. Participate in an event [charity or community]

  12. Curation - Creating a collection of resources [physical or online]

  13. Following Twitter Feeds or Blogs - journaling your impressions

  14. Starting a Twitter Feed or blog about your topic

  15. Keeping a research journal

  16. Video Journal an experience

  17. Conduct an Experiment

  18. Test Computer Code

  19. Create an App

  20. Chart a Contrast/Comparison

  21. Creating an “Infographic” to include in your presentation

  22. Questionnaires to a small group of people

  23. Survey a group [survey must be approved by Teacher and Lead Adviser]

  24. Create a Statistical survey

  25. Opinion Poll

Jump Start:

Write your paper with the presentation in mind.  

Maybe even build your presentation slides to help organize and outline the paper.   

Things to include in the Presentation: 

  • · Introduction
  • · Background Research
  • · Primary Research Methods
  • · Primary Research Findings
  • · Conclusion

 

Introduction

How will you introduce the topic to the audience? 

· Brief gripping story or anecdote

· Surprising, and highly significant facts or statistics

· Summary of a compelling case study

· Powerful quote that leads into your research

Background Research:

  • WHO - Who are the researchers in the field? Who am I writing about?
  • WHERE - Where does the research take place? Is there a prominent location or institution in the research?
  • WHAT - What are the relevant studies? What is the state of the art today? 
  • WHEN - When does the research take place? What dates are significant?
  • HOW – How was the research conducted? How have others gone about trying to solve problems you want to tackle, and in what ways will your approach build on and vary from previous work?

 

Primary Research 

Primary Research Methodology:

Write about how you conducted research - Methodology [Primary Research - Survey, Interview, Test, Experiment, Case Study, Contrast/Comparison, Project Journal, and Internship] 

Primary Research Findings:

Data to include - Findings/Data/Results  

[Explanation of your results can include the use of Tables, Photos, and Maps]

 

 

Presentation Tips

Mrs. Little's Google Slides Presentation

Before Public Speaking Ted Talk playlist

Pecha Kucha

Free Google Slides Templates

Free Google Slides Backgrounds

Get Ideas from these Google Slides Templates

Venues 

The Black Box        

The Science Lecture Hall 

The Library                  The Chapel           

- seats 50-60

- seats 63

- seats 75

- seats 300

 

 

 

 

Venues:

  • Chapel – 100-115 students and faculty
  • Library Main Room -100-115 students and faculty
  • Blackbox  50 - 75 students and faculty
  • Science Lecture Hall 40 - 50 students and faculty

Good Place to Start

Subscription Journals

Free Online Journals

 

Humanities STEM
JURN finds arts and humanities journals, book chapters, and theses. Science Direct site has 250,000 open-access articles.
Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) searches more than 7,000 open-access journals, which are searchable at the article level. Wiley free and open-access journals.
High Wire Press boasts that it provides “the largest archive of free full-text science on Earth!” Look for journals marked “free site.” National Institutes of Health offers some of the most extensive access to health research.

 

TED Talks

https://www.ted.com/topics

 

 


High School Cutting Edge Research

Inspiration

 

Graduating senior Alex Emerson ’17 from Phillips Academy might just have the fresh perspective the scientific community needs for its battle against cancer. 

In Christine Marshall-Walker’s yearlong Bio 600: Molecular and Cellular Biology Research class, Emerson and his classmates were tasked with posing an original scientific question, designing a set of experiments, and carrying out a research project. Inspired by a recent study showing that N-3-Oxo-Dodecanoyl-L-Homoserine Lactone (HSL), a molecule released by the superbug Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, can slow the spread of pancreatic cancer, Emerson wondered whether the same compound might inhibit the movement of glioblastoma (brain cancer) cells. “Alex’s project is unique in that he’s artfully maximized the resources available in our lab, employing a combination of two popular model systems to pursue a really cool question,” says Marshall-Walker.  During the course of the year, Emerson has proven himself to be a methodical experimentalist, carefully performing his work with minimal guidance from Marshall-Walker. In only a few months’ time, he demonstrated reliable decreases in migration within his cell cultures without compromising cell survival. He hopes that one day it will be possible to use the HSL molecule therapeutically in humans to stop the spread of brain cancer without killing healthy cells.N-3-Oxo-Dodecanoyl-L-Homoserine Lactone (HSL), a molecule released by the superbug Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, can slow the spread of pancreatic cancer, Emerson wondered whether the same compound might inhibit the movement of glioblastoma (brain cancer) cells. “Alex’s project is unique in that he’s artfully maximized the resources available in our lab, employing a combination of two popular model systems to pursue a really cool question,” says Marshall-Walker.  During the course of the year, Emerson has proven himself to be a methodical experimentalist, carefully performing his work with minimal guidance from Marshall-Walker. In only a few months’ time, he demonstrated reliable decreases in migration within his cell cultures without compromising cell survival. He hopes that one day it will be possible to use the HSL molecule therapeutically in humans to stop the spread of brain cancer without killing healthy cells.

 

Intel Competition  - https://apps2.societyforscience.org/AbstractSearch/Abstract/Index

 

Thomas William Colburn  - Oak Ridge High School Tennessee

Thomas William Colburn, 17, of Oak Ridge, investigated a way to make plastic litter decompose faster in sunlight for his Intel Science Talent Search chemistry project. In this latest phase of a two-year polymer project, Thomas found that adding light-sensitive nanoparticles of titanium dioxide to plastics used for shopping bags would cause them to degrade in about six months when exposed to ultraviolet light, or about 90 percent faster than the nearly five years required without the additive. Similarly, a plastic milk jug would decay in about 23 years, instead of almost 270 years. Thomas cautions, however, that additional research is needed to more accurately simulate the spectrum of actual sunlight required to break down the treated plastics and to assess the additive’s efficacy in an ocean environment.

           

2017 MIT INSPIRE Competition - https://getinspired.mit.edu/competition-0

Sponsored by the MIT School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences Dean's Office

John Xu  - Project: "Mitigating Congestion through Map Design: A Case Study of Washington DC Subway"

School: Deerfield Academy, MA  Category: Science, Technology and Society

 

Sponsored by the Council for the Arts at MIT

Prathik Naidu  - Project: "Project Mercury: An Accurate Edge Detection and Character Recognition Tool for Analyzing Ancient Classical Inscriptions"  School: Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, VA  Category: Art and Architecture

 

Sponsored by the MIT Community Service Fund

Jia Zhang   -  Project: "The Theory of Revolution:  Impact of Nationalistic vs. Ethnocentric Revolutionary Rhetoric on the Ethnic Relations...(con't)"  School: Belmont High School, MA  Category: History

 

Sponsored by the MIT COOP

Lenna Kanehara  - Project: "Koreans in Japan: Chongryon's Fight Against Assimilation"

Bloomfield Hills, Michigan  Category: History

“On whose shoulders are you standing?”

With the Junior Project, you began to explore your passions and creativity.  

We would like you to continue this work by contemplating the question “On whose shoulders are you standing?”  

Although it is important to create works of your own, it is equally important to realize and research the works of others.  

Even Isaac Newton acknowledged "if I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants."

 

 

 

CITE your sources 

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